Is Steel The Way To Go For Your Deck?

Trex Announces Acquisition of Iron Deck

Wooden decks have a long history in American culture. There’s just something about the high colors that different kinds of wood offer, and the feel of warm wood beneath your bare feet in the summer. However, wooden decks can sometimes cause worries and problems: termites, wood decay, and regular use and tear with age. Perhaps it’s time to start giving wooden decks a steel backbone!

I’m happy to announce that new steel options on the market are giving homeowners the chance to enjoy stronger, age-resistant, and more eco-friendly decks that can last up to 25 years. One of my most trusted suppliers, Trex Company, has announced the acquisition of Iron Deck®, a manufacturer of steel deck framing systems.

The consequence of this marriage is a new steel framing product called Trex Elevations™, which is meant to replaces the wooden substructure of a deck. A substructure is the hidden sustain system of a deck. It’s what keeps the deck standing strong throughout the years of use. The Trex Elevations substructure can be hidden by an outer wood framing. In other words, customers get all the beauty of a wooden deck or composite decking with all the benefits of a strong, steel skeleton.

What are the benefits of steel? Trex Elevations will be manufactured from dual-coated, galvanized steel, which will help decks last longer by preventing shared causes of deck destruction such as termites and wood decay. Unlike wood, steel does not warp, twist, divided or decay. City build Departments will recognize the stronger more lasting qualities of steel which will make for permitting ease. Trex is offering a 25-year limited warranty, far surpassing the usual 15-year warranty offered by pressure-treated wood.

Trex already adds an environmental motive. Their steel product contains 25% recycled material, and scraps from the jobsite are 100% recyclable. The design course of action needed for steel will eliminate most of the waste also.

Using the new Trex product for a deck’s substructure might not be the best choice in every circumstance, but it is certainly a very exciting development. As a contractor, I can now offer my customers additional attractive options for their deck. I like the idea of building more obtain, longer-lasting decks and using materials that are a little better for the ecosystem. I am sure customers will appreciate a more lasting deck that will require less care and maintenance and more barbeques and outdoor parties.

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